In last weeks editorial, I discussed the complex situation regarding Game Of The Year nominees and what it should take to win the award. In this weeks article, I’ll change gears a bit. I’ll talk about a topic that isn’t often discussed; the emotional impact in videogames.

When videogames started becoming mainstream in the early-1990s, most of the popular titles were either mindless shooters, sports games, or platformers. When the PlayStation was released in 1994 and 3D based graphics started to take off, then compelling storylines started to unfold. Games like Metal Gear Solid were creating boundaries no one knew existed. With dramatic dialogue, characters that for once you could emotionally connect to and an engaging soundtrack, videogames were no longer ‘games’, they were art. That is not to say that non-emotionally driven games were bad. There was some excellent titles that you could mindlessly play, without worrying about the storyline or the plot. But for the first time in my videogame playing history, I nearly cried at the end of MGS.


Revolutionary for it’s time, Metal Gear Solid broke grounds with its emotional storyline and stealth gameplay.

As console technology advances, so will the quality of the games. Heavy Rain is a prime example of a game that is going to be successful mainly because of the emotional impact it possesses. Games such as Heavy Rain will completely shatter the publics perception of what videogames are. Already videogames are standing up against some of Hollywood’s biggest thrillers.


Heavy Rain is promising to be one of the most emotionally intensive video games to date. Will it live to the expectations?

As console technology advances, so will the quality of the games. Heavy Rain is a prime example of a game that is going to be successful mainly because of the emotional impact it possesses. Games such as Heavy Rain will completely shatter the publics perception of what videogames are. Already videogames are standing up against some of Hollywood’s biggest thrillers.

From Pong to Metal Gear Solid 4, it is amazing how far this industry has traveled. It is exciting to think what the future holds for videogames. How will our perception of video games change? Will we not even call them “games” anymore?

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